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February 3, 2017: Insurance now participating with traditional medicare plans.

At each visit, patients are provided a “medical receipt”  that they can use to submit to individual insurance plans that offer “out of network “ or “health savings plan” reimbursement options.

January 31, 2017: The National Vulvodynia Association

Dr. Kellogg was named to the Executive Board of The National Vulvodynia Association.

September 13, 2016: Effective October 1, 2016 Center for Pelvic Medicine will no longer be accepting insurance for payment

2017 We do participate with traditional medicare plans.

June 7, 2015: Dr. Kellogg Approves Female Libido Pill Flibanserin CBS News

Dr. Kellogg CBS News Approves Flibanserin  first FDA Libido drug Approved for Women.

 VIDEO

Get “the little pink pill” Flibanserin used For Women with low desire low sex drive from Center for Pelvic Medicine in Rosemont PA

The pill is to boost women’s sexual desire. The “little pink pill” is one step closer to going on the market. After saying no twice, an FDA panel finally recommended the first medication for female sexual dysfunction. Unlike  drugs for men, like Viagra, which improve blood flow, Flibanserin is an anti-depressant that works on the pleasure center of the brain.

The pill, however, comes with side effects, which include insomnia, nausea and dizziness. As always, women will need to decide whether the risks versus the benefits compared to other treatment alternatives are worth it for them.

The panel of Food and Drug Administration advisers voted 18-6 in favor of Sprout Pharmaceutical’s daily pill, flibanserin, on the condition that the company develops a plan to manage its risks.

 

August 6, 2014: Vulvar Pain Relief in Menopausal Women with Neogyn

New Study Proves Neogyn Significantly Helps Menopausal Women Alleviate Vulvar Pain, Improve Sex Lives

Neogyn is available from Dr. Susan Kellogg Spadt, located at the Center For Pelvic Medicine.

A new study spearheaded by the Southern California Center for Health & Survivorship Medicine and the Academic Urology Center for Pelvic Medicine concludes that the vulvar-soothing cream Neogyn meaningfully alleviates these symptoms in otherwise-healthy post-menopausal women.

Dr. Susan Kellogg Spadt, PhD, sexual health expert and Director of Female Sexual Medicine at the Academic Urology Center for Pelvic Medicine outside of Philadelphia, and another of the study’s authors, points out that any woman might develop vaginal pain and discomfort, but the following categories of women are especially vulnerable: menopausal and post-menopausal women, birth control users, cancer survivors and women with certain chronic medical conditions.

May 1, 2014: Summer Weather and Bikini Season Can Mean Chronic Irritation … ‘Down There’

Academic Urology’s Center for Pelvic Medicine Offers Solutions That Can Help
Women don’t need to ‘learn to live’ with vulvar discomfort. Activities like exercise and physical intimacy certainly should not chronically hurt. When a woman overcomes soreness, dryness, and genital burning, the quality of her life is restored and she can look forward to pleasurable activities again. Neogyn can be life changing”

April 24, 2014: Got Pelvic Pain? Do’s & Don’ts For Working With Your Care Provider

Pelvic pain patients are challenging but also very encouraging.

March 30, 2014: Female Trouble, 50-plus

Genital dryness and painful sex are common in postmenopausal women, but are little reported or discussed. Experts say it doesn’t have to be that way.

“People talk about hot flashes, emotional lability, and insomnia,” said Susan Kellogg Spadt, a specialist in pelvic and sexual health. “But it’s funny, they rarely say, ‘Are you burning like fire when you’re entered?’ It’s the part that gets left out.”

In her practice, the Center for Pelvic Medicine in Bryn Mawr, PA, one of the most common stories Kellogg Spadt hears is from women who, thinking they have a yeast infection, buy an over-the-counter medication that makes the pain worse. “It happens all the time,” she said. “And what’s tragic,” she added, is that even after patients go to see their health-care provider, the right diagnosis may still not be made. “These women begin to question themselves. They lose faith in their own voice.”

“After menopause, there is a new normal,” Kellogg Spadt said.”But sex should never, never be painful.”